An introduction to the issue of maltreatment of children

How to Report Suspected Child Maltreatment How to Report Suspected Child Maltreatment If you suspect a child is being abused or neglected, or if you are a child who is being maltreated, contact your local child protective services office or law enforcement agency so professionals can assess the situation. Many States have a toll-free number to call to report suspected child abuse or neglect.

An introduction to the issue of maltreatment of children

The authors point out that not only do children have their childhood damaged, but a proportion also have continuing problems in their adult lives. This information complements the first two papers. Each of the three papers points out the importance of clear definitions, which is essential if we are to be able to obtain accurate prevalence studies and compare different outcome studies.

While these three papers concentrate on data from Canada and the United States, similar findings on the adverse impact on the development of abused children are documented for other countries. Toth and Cicchetti the lack of clear operational criteria for defining child maltreatment; that maltreatment does not affect all children similarly; the importance of research on how maltreatment during infancy leads to insecure attachment relationships with caregivers; adverse outcomes in substance abuse, educational problems and criminal behaviour in some young people and adults who suffered maltreatment in childhood; the lack of sound evidence on the efficiency of interventions for maltreated children.

While this commentator broadly agrees with the research and conclusions of these authors, there are some other factors that should also be considered. An important consideration is whether the consequences of child abuse are a result of the abuse itself or a result of the adverse environment in which the child remains.

Episodes of maltreatment may be thought of as a signal of serious underlying family problems that, if not treated, will continue to have adverse effects on the child.

It is likely to be the environment that resulted in the abuse, rather than the episode of abuse itself, which has these adverse effects. Toth and Cicchetti point out that removal of a maltreated child from the home does not constitute treatment.

While this is true, in some families it may be the best option for the child, as long as removal is followed by placement into a long-term, stable, nurturing family relationship and the child is provided with appropriate ongoing treatment.

When looking at adverse outcomes in maltreated children, intervening life events need to be taken into account.

An introduction to the issue of maltreatment of children

It is true that maltreated children are more likely to have an increased number of adverse life events, perhaps because of their family circumstances and the impact of the abuse. It is however important in documenting the outcomes in abused children to look at the impact of adverse life events in the interval between the abuse and the time of re-evaluation to see to what degree outcome may be related to adverse events, rather than to the abuse itself.

The papers by Pollak and Toth and Cicchetti briefly refer to the possible importance of neurobiological factors. Some intriguing data are appearing in this area. It has been shown in genetically engineered mice that the absence of a gene, fosB, appears to interfere with the ability of male and female mice to nurture their young.

This may help partly explain the variation in the sequelae of maltreatment.

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Findings such as these may have future implications for offering the most intense forms of treatment to families and children most at risk. It is important for neuroscientists, geneticists and social scientists to work together as there are exciting opportunities for better understanding and then treating child maltreatment.

Finally, the incidence of one form of abuse, child sexual abuse, is falling, at least in the United States. Implications for Policy and Services These three useful papers point to the importance of carefully defining the problem of abuse, the need to accurately monitor the incidence of abuse and the importance of providing appropriate treatment programs for children, as well as for families.

It is vital that any such treatment programs be properly evaluated. One way to do this would be to quarantine a proportion of the funding budget for treatment programs to ensure that careful evaluations were performed so that inadequate treatment programs would not be pursued and effective ones could be continued.

The development of abused children. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology ;26 5: Sexually abused children five years after presentation: Maltreatment and coping strategies among male adolescents living in the Gaza Strip.

The relative influence of childhood sexual abuse and other family background risk factors on adult adversities in female outpatients treated for anxiety disorders and depression.

Cross-cultural comparisons of child-reported emotional and physical abuse: A defect in nurturing in mice lacking the immediate early gene fosB. Role of genotype in the cycle of violence in maltreated children.

Jones LM, Finkelhor D. Putting together evidence on declining trends in sexual abuse: How to cite this article:A.

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Introduction. These three papers discuss the high incidence of child maltreatment, the multiple factors involved, the importance of the child’s family and the serious consequences seen in the way many maltreated children develop. Introduction.

Fractures are the second most common injury caused by child physical abuse; bruises are the most common injury. 1 Failure to identify an injury caused by child abuse and to intervene appropriately may place a child at risk for further abuse, with potentially permanent consequences for the child.

2 – 4 Physical abuse may not be considered in the physician’s differential.

An introduction to the issue of maltreatment of children

However tragic and sensational, the counts of deaths and serious injuries provide limited insight into the pervasive long-term social, behavioral, and cognitive consequences of child abuse and neglect.

Reports of child maltreatment alone also reveal little about the interactions among individuals, families, communities, and society that lead to such incidents.

Violence is a serious public health problem.

Introduction. Fractures are the second most common injury caused by child physical abuse; bruises are the most common injury. 1 Failure to identify an injury caused by child abuse and to intervene appropriately may place a child at risk for further abuse, with potentially permanent consequences for the child. 2 – 4 Physical abuse may not be considered in the physician’s differential. Robert D. Sege, Lisa Amaya-Jackson, AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect, Council on Foster Care, Adoption, and Kinship Care; AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY Committee on Child Maltreatment and Violence; NATIONAL CENTER FOR CHILD TRAUMATIC STRESS. Introduction. Child maltreatment is a pervasive public health issue affecting thousands of children across the United States. In , more than 1, children from newborns to age 17 died from abuse and benjaminpohle.com majority of these victims, 68 percent, were 4 years of age or younger.

From infants to the elderly, it affects people in all stages of life. Many more survive violence and suffer physical, mental, and or emotional health problems throughout the rest of their lives.

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